Local Music Scene: Tanner J. Peck

Tanner J Peck FB cover

Source: Local Music Scene

Last month’s Local Music Scene featured Tanner J. Peck at Bryant Lake Bowl. If you haven’t been to the Local Music Scene before, let me introduce you to it. Each month features a local musician as a guest along with an ensemble of improv artists. The musicians plays a song and the artists create and improv scene inspired by the lyrics,

This past month taught us a lot about the guest musician – Tanner works for the US Postal Service and had a plethora of stories about delivering mail and telling people at parties he might deliver their mail. This gave the improv team a lot of fuel and they came up with scenes involving:

  • a cat in a box that multiplies itself every time the lid is opened
  • a show-down between USPS, Fed Ex and UPS
  • roommates who want their friend to just finish their spoken word piece so she’ll unlock the fridge in the apartment
  • and many more

I love seeing what from the musician’s music or discussion stands out and makes its way into the scenes. Improv is quickly becoming one of my favorite kind of creation and performance, and this set-up with music as inspiration is unique and always a lot of fun.

This month’s Local Music Scene features the Carnivorous Birds and will be at Bryant Lake Bowl this Friday, September 29th. Ticket and show information can be found on Bryant Lake Bowl’s website.

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Velvet Swing: Workshop

If there’s one thing I’ve learned about playwriting in the last year, it’s that seeing your work presented in front of an audience and performed by actors is one of the most amazing and also the most terrifying things in the world. I especially enjoy attending workshop of other people’s work because getting a look at what putting a show together and what the writing process looks like for others is fascinating and I personally admire anyone for sharing a work in progress with the (sometimes less than kind) public.

Savage Umbrella recently staged two nights of workshops at Bryant Lake Bowl for Velvet Swing, a work-in-progress about the life of Evelyn Nesbit, a performer who became famous after her husband, Harry Thaw, killed millionaire Stanford White, a patron of Nesbit’s who had also had a sexual relationship with her. Written by Alana Horton and Megan Clark, this workshop performance featuring Nayely Becerra, Antiona Perez, Jessie Scarborough-Ghent, Mickaylee Shaugnessy, and Leslie Vincent and included forty-five minutes of the piece so far. Certain actors played Thaw and White, while the ensemble all became Nesbit in all her complex incarnations.

Because this isn’t a performance, this piece isn’t a review but rather a look at this workshop and what I love about this process. Though the performance was only a small part of what the piece will eventually become, there was a bold look at what sort of story is being told about Nesbit – a look at what it’s like to be a woman, especially a woman who’s considered good-looking in America. Conversations in the talk-back and had by me after the show involved thinking about Nesbit as a sex symbol, someone who has star power and how the cult of fame can be dangerous, how the court room can turn on a young woman and make her the criminal instead of the victim (ie: look at Kesha, every woman involved in campus rape allegations, I could go on), and how women continually struggle between inaccurate dichotomies of being sexual and innocent. This workshop was the perfect thing to lure me into wanting to see more and I can’t wait to see where this work goes. I’m still overwhelmed in admiration for Horton and Clark to share their work with us and I can’t wait to see what comes next.

Local Music Scene: Geoffrey Brown

localscene

If you’re like me and you just realized it’s the end of February, then you might be thinking about attending this month’s Local Music Scene at Bryant Lake Bowl. But first, here’s a very belated look at January’s event with Geoffrey Brown, of the Dregs.

If you’re unfamiliar with the Local Music Scene, each month a local musician performs some of their songs while a team of improv artists brainstorm scenes based off the lyrics. After the songs, the artists perform the scenes. Geoffrey Brown, who describes his songwriting as, “I specialize in sad songs with catchy melodies” provided the audiences with songs perfect for our “post-truth” era about lying, truth, and poverty, as well as stories about pretending to play the banjo and giving advice of choosing adventure “because safety’s boring.”

The improv scenes that accompanied were wonderful, playing off the themes of truth, adventure, and reminding us it’s a bad idea to tell your sister you can totally play the banjo at her wedding when you can’t play at all. If you’re looking for an opportunity to take life a little less seriously and enjoy some local music, certainly check it out. They’re back at Bryant Lake on the 27th with Amanda Costner as their music guest.

Ticket and show information can be found on The Local Music Scene’s Facebook page or Bryant Bowl’s website. For more of Geoffrey Brown’s music, check him out on Gigsalad.

 

A Very Die Hard Christmas

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Source: Bryantlakebowl.com

If you’re feeling more naughty than nice this holiday season and looking for something a little different in your choices of festive fair, check out A Very Die Hard Christmas at Bryant Lake Bowl. Based of the 1988 movie staring Bruce Willis and the late great Alan Rickman, this musical parody retells the story of John McClane, a Jack Bauer-like cop who, unlike Bauer, “can get those problems solved in two hours. I don’t need twenty-four.” McClane is just trying to get home for the holidays to see his kids and estranged wife, Holly (Anna Weggel-Reed). But wouldn’t you just know it, West German extremists take over the Christmas party Holly is attending at Nakatomi Plaza, led by the hostile Hans Gruber (Matt Sciple). Bent on destroying the Nakatomi Corporation because… because evil, Gruber holds the party hostage and demands some secret code things.

Okay, so I’ve seen Die Hard at least four times, and I always get lost here. What exactly does the Nakatomi Corporation do? Why does Gruber want to mess with them? Why does McClane jump in solo to mess with literally a whole brigade of terrorists? Relax, Die Hard Christmas tells us. Don’t think too hard about the film’s gaping plot holes. Marvel instead at the Carson’s hilarious take on McClane and Sciple’s fantastic Alan Rickman impression. Enjoy a highly talented ensemble of Andy Rocco Kraft, Dan Hetzel, Anna Hickey (who for this weekend is doing double duty, performing both in Baltimore is Burning and this show) , and Brad Erickson, playing partygoers, Germans, and magical Christmas puppets.

Oh, yes, did I mention there are puppets? Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer-esque puppets and a Don Bluth-like mouse, incorporate other Christmas films and 1980s culture into the story. There’s a lot of references to 1980s film and TV throughout the show, from Pretty Woman to Steven Seagal to The Princess Bride, including an entire gag focused on working the names of 80s TV shows into dialogue. Mixed in with music throughout (such as a duet of “Where Are You Christmas” with Holly and her very pregnant co-worker Ginny and a variation of “What’s This?” sung by Gruber), this performance takes an iconic action film and makes it a spectacular and ridiculous celebration of the holidays.

I don’t remember Die Hard being so weirdly uncomfortable when I saw it as a kid but post-9/11 and post-Trump it sure feels a lot more dire than I recall. Thankfully, the bit of camp, the magical holiday puppets, and layers of humor embedded into this piece makes the parody work instead of being trapped in a conflict with the awfulness that has been 2016. It’s wildly inappropriate, bloody, brash, and also incredibly endearing. I loved it. Carson’s stellar improv and the cast’s breaking of the forth wall alone made me understand why people have been supporting this show for five years. There hasn’t been a lot to laugh about this year (not cynically, at least) and it was wonderful to see something that honestly made me laugh so hard my sides ached. So if you need a pick-me-up this holiday season and want to see a wildly funny take on a classic 80s film, this show’s for you.

A Very Die Hard Christmas is written by Josh Carson and directed by Brad Erickson. It is playing now through December 17th at Bryant Lake Bowl. Show and ticket information can be found on Bryant Lake Bowl’s website.